New Trent Brewery, Spen Lane – George Robinson Jun & Co – New Trent Brewery Co Ltd

The brewery was located beside the railway to the west of Crowle Wharf. It had its own railway siding. The site is now occupied by the food processing company Canley Packers.

New Trent Brewery Location

History

 The Brewery was constructed in 1878.

14 March 1882 – Partnership between Thomas Dymond, George Robinson, the younger, and Thomas Nutt dissolved as Thomas Nutt has retired. Thomas Dymond and George Robinson to take over.

Stamford MercuryFriday 13 March 1882
Stamford Mercury
Friday 13 March 1882

[Thomas Nutt Was George Robinson, Junior’s Brother-in-Law.]

13 October 1883 – Thomas Dymond dissolved his partnership with George Robinson.

In preparation for the Auction in June a valuation of the Brewery and its other properties was carried out by Hebblethwaite & Son, Land Agents of Hull. The paper relating to this valuation are now in the Hull History Centre and can be seen here; This includes an estimate of the costs for building the Brewery.

At that time the company owned the following 16 pubs;

Crowle: Darby & Joan, Fishmongers Arms

Luddington: Blue Bell, Friendship Inn

Keadby: Mariners Arms

Belton: Wheat Sheaf Inn,

Epworth: White Bear, Ellers Tavern

Haxey: Kings Arms

Doncaster: Dockin Hill Tavern, Red Lion Hotel

Hull: Albert Inn

Amcotts: Ingleby Arms

West Halton: Butchers Arms

East Butterwick: Oddfellows Arms

Misterton: Wind Mill

All the pubs with the exception of the Ellers Tavern were bought between 1876 and 1878.

The Property of Mr Robinson and not included in Brewery Assets 

Crowle Wharf: Robinsons Hotel
Epworth: Queens Head

The brewery itself had cost £7,810 to build and in building the whole company a total of £26,883 had been expended on the Brewery and Pubs. The mortgage was £16,266. The whole company was valued at £18,188

The original partnership of three had put in shares of £7000 each. However in 1882 Thomas Dymond purchased Thomas Nutt’s share at 50/- in the £ – ie he paid £3,500. The valuer notes that Dymonds share was £10,00 to Robinson’s £7000.

Notes by the valuer include a summary of Brewery turnover which had significantly fallen off between 1879 (£8,900) and 1883 (£4,054). This was put down to “The inferior brewings and the disputes between the partners account for the falling off of the trade in the latter years “

New Trent Brewery Auction Stamford Mercury Friday 30 May 1884
New Trent Brewery Auction
Stamford Mercury Friday 30 May 1884

12 Jun 1884 – Brewery Auctioned, by order of the Mortgagee, along with the Mariner’s Arms in Keadby and the Red Lion Inn in Doncaster. Report in the Sheffield Independent stated that the Brewery and Mariner’s Arms were withdrawn without a bid whereas the Red Lion was withdrawn at £2000.

28 August 1886 – Partnership between Thomas Dymond, of Barnsley, and George Robinson, the younger, dissolved. Had been operating as George Robinson Junior and company. Thomas Dymond to continue under the name New Trent Brewery.

1891 – Thomas Dymond Purchased the New Trent Inn for £1400. Additionally he bought the two adjoining villas for Joseph Franks.

1898 – Thomas Dymond died, after which the brewery was run by his executors until 1900 when it was taken over by John Dymond, his son.

New Tent Brewery Company Ltd registered in 1911 to acquire the business carried on by John Dymond. Closed for financial reasons in 1915.

1916 the Barnsley Brewery Company took over the lease of the New Trent Brewery Company of Crowle and their 36 licensed houses and in 1918, took full control of the Company.

1918 Property commandeered as a “Flax Factory” by the Ministry of Supply. However by 1925 the assets of Flax Cultivation, Ltd were being sold off including the site at Crowle which was sold to Mr R Thomas.

1951 – New Trent Brewery in administration – I suspect this was in order to wind the company up.

New Trent Brewery AuctionSheffield IndependentFriday 13 June 1884
New Trent Brewery Auction
Sheffield Independent
Friday 13 June 1884
George Robinson Bankruptcy 1895

 




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