Lords of the Manor of Crowle

In mediaeval times the manor was the nucleus of English rural life.

At the Norman conquest all the land in England was owned by the monarch who then granted the use of it to earls, barons, and others, in return for military service.

The lord of the manor had both economic and judicial powers. Regular courts were held to uphold these rights.

The courts baron, dealt with the tenants’ rights and duties, changes of occupancy, and disputes between tenants.

The courts leet,  elected constables and other officials and were effectively Magistrates Courts for minor offences.

At the time of the Domesday Survey the manor of Crowle was held by the Abbot of St. German of Geoffrey de Wirce the tenant-in-chief. Crowle Manor remained in the hands of the Abbots of Selby for nearly 500 years until 1539, when after Henry VIII’s Dissolution of the Monasteries, it reverted to the King and was retained in royal hands.

In 1551 the manor, with many other properties in Lincolnshire and elsewhere was granted to Edward Fynes, Lord Clynton and Saye, Lord High Admiral and it appears to have been re-granted to Queen Elizabeth in c 1565

In 1629 a survey of the boundary of the Manor of Crowle is said to have been taken by a jury for the citizens of London then owners of the lordship.

They did not hold the manor for very long, as by 1636 Robert Pierrepont, 1st Earl of Kingston-upon-Hull was lord of the Manor of Crowle.

In 1806 Charles Pierrepoint became the 1st Earl Manvers and the Manor of Crowle was held by Earl Manvers until 1955 when with the 6th Earl’s death the Manvers title became extinct. However as he was succeeded by his daughter Lady Rozelle Raynes, who died in 2015.

Crowle is fortunate as many of the manorial records still exist and can be seen at Lincoln Archives, Nottingham University and the British Library.

The earliest records date to 1310 and courts were held as late as 1925.

By the late 19th century an early 20th century the courts were held in the local inns – the Darby & Joan being a regular venue.

The records at Lincoln include a number of plans and surveys, the most impressive of which is from 1738.

 

As far as I can deduce;

1086 (Domesday Book) Abbot of St. German of Geoffrey de Wirce the tenant-in-chief.

Abbots of Selby

1086 Benedict, 1069-97
1097 Hugh de Lacy, 1097-1123
1123 Herbert, 1123-7
1127 Durand, 1127-37 (fn. 32)
(A vacancy of two years)
1139 Walter, 1139-43 (fn. 33)
1143 Helias Paynel, 1143-53
1153 German, 1153-60
1160 Gilbert de Vere, 1160-84
(A vacancy 1184-9)
1189 Roger de London, 1189-95
1195 Richard I (fn. 34) (prior), 1195-1214
1214 Alexander, 1214 (fn. 34a) -21 (fn. 35)
1221 Richard, 1221, (fn. 35a) resigned 1223 (fn. 35b)
1223 Richard (sub-prior of Selby), 1223 (fn. 36)
1245 Hugh de Drayton, 1245, died 1254
1254 Thomas de Whalley, 1254, deprived 1263
1263 David de Cawod, 1263-9
1270 Thomas de Whalley, (fn. 37) restored 1270, deprived again 1280
1280 William de Aslakeby (prior), 1280, died 1293

In 1281 the Abbot was stated to hold the soke of Crowle of the Lord King in perpetual alms (Rotzcli Hundredorum I, London, 1812, p. 339)

1294 John de Wystow I (sub-prior), 1294, resigned 1300
1300 William de Aslaghby (sacrist), 1300, died 1313
1313 Simon de Scardeburg (prior), 1313, died 1321
1322 John de Wystow II, (fn. 38) 1322, died 1335
1335 John de Heslyngton (a monk), 1335, died 1342
1342 Geoffrey de Gaddesby, 1342, died 1368 (fn. 39)
1369 John de Shirburn, 1369, died 1408
1408 William Pigot, 1408, died 1429 (fn. 40)
1429 John Cave, 1429, died 1436
1436 John Ousthorp, 1436, died 1466 (fn. 41)
1406 John Sharrow, 1406, (fn. 41a) died 1486
1487 Lawrence Selby, 1487-1504
1504 Robert Depyng (monk of Crowland), (fn. 42) 1504-18
1518 Thomas Rawlinson, 1518-22
1522 John Barwic, 1522-6
1526 Robert Selby, 1526-40

1539 (Dissolution of the Monasteries) Henry VIII

The soke reverted to the King and was retained for the time being in royal hands, although the whole water of Crowle and the fishery thereof was granted to Sir Ralph Sadleyr of Hackney, Middlesex, along with the site of the Abbey of Selby and many of its lands (Letters and Pa#ers, Foreign and Domestic, Henry VIII 1540, p. 509).

1548 Level of Hatfield Chase

1551 Edward Fynes, Lord Clynton and Saye, Lord High Admiral

The manor, with many other properties in Lincolnshire and elsewhere was granted to Edward Fynes, Lord Clynton and Saye, Lord High Admiral, reference being made to appurtenances in Amcotts, Garthorpe, Evylthwayte, Luddington and Eastoft (Calendar of Patent Rolls Edward VI 1550-3, pp. 203-12)

1565 Queen Elizabeth I

It appears to have been re-granted to Queen Elizabeth in c. 1565 (ms. calendar of Feet of Fines 1-18 Eliz., p. 135, in the Foster Library).

1628  City of London

The Manor was conveyed to the City of London under the Ditchfield Grant in 1628 along with various other areas by Charles 1st in satisfaction of two loans made to him by the Corporation of London.

An 18th century copy of the boundary of the Lordship of Crowle in 1629 is said to have been taken by a jury for the citizens of London then owners of the Lordship (C.M. ~/IO p. 7) but they did not hold the manor for very long.

Crowle manor was re-sold to Sir Gervase Elwes, Jeremiah Elwes, and Nicholas Hamerton

by 1636  Robert Pierrepont, 1st Earl of Kingston-upon-Hull (1584–1643)

1643 Henry Pierrepont, 2nd Earl of Kingston-upon-Hull (1607–1680) Created Marquess of Dorchester

1680 Robert Pierrepont, 3rd Earl of Kingston-upon-Hull (c. 1660 – June 1682)

1682 William Pierrepont, 4th Earl of Kingston-upon-Hull (c. 1662 – 17 September 1690)

1690 Evelyn Pierrepont, 5th Earl and 1st Duke of Kingston-upon-Hull (c. 1655 – 5 March 1726)

1726 Evelyn Pierrepont, 2nd Duke of Kingston-upon-Hull, KG (1711 – 23 September 1773)

1773 Charles Pierrepont (born Charles Medows,), 1st Earl Manvers (1737–1816)

1816 Charles Herbert Pierrepont, 2nd Earl Manvers (1778–1860)

1860 Sydney William Herbert Pierrepont, 3rd Earl Manvers (1825–1900)

1900 Charles William Sydney Pierrepont, 4th Earl Manvers (1854–1926)

1926 Evelyn Robert Pierrepont, 5th Earl Manvers (25 July 1888–6 April 1940). Styled Viscount Newark from 1900 to 1926, he was the eldest son of Charles Pierrepont, 4th Earl Manvers. Educated at Eton, he suffered a mental breakdown at the age of 17 and was incapacitated for the remainder of his life. His estates were administered by a trust. He never married, and his cousin Gervas succeeded to the title on his death.

1940 Gervas Evelyn Pierrepont, 6th Earl Manvers (1881–1955)

The title of Earl Manvers became extinct on his death in 1955.

His only surviving child, Lady Rozelle Raynes, inherited the Manvers estates.

 

 

References:

http://www.lincolnshire.gov.uk/upload/public/attachments/551/REPORT4.pdf

http://www.rotherhamweb.co.uk/h/dukeries/pierrepont.htm

http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=36216

 

 

 

 




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